Q-Fever Vaccination

Q-Fever is a disease that can be spread to humans mainly from cattle, sheep and goats. The germ is spread in the urine, faeces and milk, but birth fluids, the foetus and the placenta are the most dangerous sources. When infected fluids dry out, the germ can remain alive in the dust for years.

 

All of our Physicians and nurses are registered with The Australian Q-Fever Registry and are able to provide Q-Fever vaccinations. This appointment is required to be completed on specific paperwork provided by the Australian Q-Fever Register and all vaccinations provided will be recorded on this site. 

 

The vaccination process is carried out over two visits. During the first visit you will have a consultation with one of our Occupational Physicians or Registrars who will provide you with information on Q-Fever and a skin test to determine whether or not you are already immune. You will then be provided with a pathology form for a blood test after leaving the clinic. The second visit must be exactly 7 days after your first appointment. During this appointment the Doctor will review the skin test and pathology results to determine whether or not the Q-Fever vaccine is required. 


frequently asked questions (FAQ's):

What is Q-Fever?

Q Fever is a disease that can be spread to humans mainly from cattle, sheep and goats. The germ is spread in the urine, faeces and milk, but birth fluids, the foetus and the placenta are the most dangerous sources. When infected fluids dry out, the germ can remain alive in the dust for years.

How do I make an appointment?

You can make an appointment by contacting our administrative team on (07) 5574 5792. Please note when making an appointment that it will consist of two visits which must be exactly 7 days apart. If it exceeds 7 days the skin test results will not be valid.

What happens to the Results?

Evidence of vaccination will be supplied to both the employee and employer. Our administrative team will then send the results to the Australian Q-Fever Register.